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Tag Archive: Drug

  1. What you need to know about cannabis

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    TAG1 Blog photo

    There is so much updated information to share about cannabis. With this in mind, the following is a short summary of the most important things you need to know.

    In most organizations, human resource professionals are adding cannabis to their policies and procedures. It falls in line with other procedures already established under substance abuse. For the most part, pundits suggest little will change in recreational cannabis usage after legalization, but only time will tell.

    Understanding more about cannabis is important to developing your policy. Cannabis has more than 85 molecules or active ingredients, but the two most popular and talked about are THC and CBD. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the molecule within cannabis that provides the hallucinogenic properties or what is referred to as the high. CBD (cannabidiol) does not contain hallucinogenic properties, which is why someone can medically be using cannabis and still be fit to drive.

    Cannabis does not yet have a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or Natural Product Number (NPN). As a result, it is not regularly included under a carrier’s formulary group drug plan. A few carriers have added a cannabis benefit that will allow an employer to add cannabis to their healthcare plan. To date those carriers are Sun Life, Green Shield and Manulife; Great West Life and GroupHEALTH have announced they will add this benefit in January 2019. A cannabis benefit could range between $1,500 and $6,000 per person, per year and requires a prescription to be eligible, but only for certain, specific medical conditions as defined by each carrier. By restricting this benefit to only certain medical conditions, the carrier is preventing the plan from reimbursing for recreational cannabis use.

    For those employers who have a Healthcare Spending Account (HCSA), the Canada Revenue Agency does allow cannabis and cannabis seeds to be reimbursed as an eligible expense, when prescribed by a doctor.

    With this new cannabis industry erupting, we will continue to see things evolving in this arena. For this reason, please note the above summary reflects information as at October 15, 2018. For more updates or advice on how to engineer your organization’s response to this upcoming change, please contact Steve Marsh at smarsh@bisinc.ca or 905.777.9990, ext. 200.

  2. What you need to know about cannabis

    Leave a Comment

    TAG1 Blog photo

    There is so much updated information to share about cannabis. With this in mind, the following is a short summary of the most important things you need to know.

    In most organizations, human resource professionals are adding cannabis to their policies and procedures. It falls in line with other procedures already established under substance abuse. For the most part, pundits suggest little will change in recreational cannabis usage after legalization, but only time will tell.

    Understanding more about cannabis is important to developing your policy. Cannabis has more than 85 molecules or active ingredients, but the two most popular and talked about are THC and CBD. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the molecule within cannabis that provides the hallucinogenic properties or what is referred to as the high. CBD (cannabidiol) does not contain hallucinogenic properties, which is why someone can medically be using cannabis and still be fit to drive.

    Cannabis does not yet have a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or Natural Product Number (NPN). As a result, it is not regularly included under a carrier’s formulary group drug plan. A few carriers have added a cannabis benefit that will allow an employer to add cannabis to their healthcare plan. To date those carriers are Sun Life, Green Shield and Manulife; Great West Life and GroupHEALTH have announced they will add this benefit in January 2019. A cannabis benefit could range between $1,500 and $6,000 per person, per year and requires a prescription to be eligible, but only for certain, specific medical conditions as defined by each carrier. By restricting this benefit to only certain medical conditions, the carrier is preventing the plan from reimbursing for recreational cannabis use.

    For those employers who have a Healthcare Spending Account (HCSA), the Canada Revenue Agency does allow cannabis and cannabis seeds to be reimbursed as an eligible expense, when prescribed by a doctor.

    With this new cannabis industry erupting, we will continue to see things evolving in this arena. For this reason, please note the above summary reflects information as at October 15, 2018. For more updates or advice on how to engineer your organization’s response to this upcoming change, please contact Steve Marsh at smarsh@bisinc.ca or 905.777.9990, ext. 200.

  3. Biologic Drugs & Subsequent Entry Drugs

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    Biologic drugs have been available in Canada and elsewhere since the 1970’s and are used to treat a wide variety of diseases, including cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Health Canada defines a biologic as a product manufactured from animals or micro-organisms through the metabolic processes of the organisms themselves. They are inherently more complex than chemically synthesized pharmaceuticals and are much more difficult to produce. Examples of biologics include insulin, vaccines, blood components, protein hormones and gene therapy products.

    Biologic drugs currently comprise between 14 – 16 percent of the Canadian pharmaceutical market and cost the Canadian health care system more than $3 billion annually. However, despite their effectiveness, the extraordinarily high cost of biologics has been a barrier to increased use. For example, it can cost $30,000 annually to administer Remicade to a patient suffering from ulcerative colitis, or $17,000 each year to treat one patient with rheumatoid arthritis who is prescribed Enbrel.

    Regulatory agencies in Canada, the United States (US), the European Union (EU) and other developed countries have attempted to address the cost issue by allowing generic pharmaceutical companies to produce their own versions of previously approved, or reference biologics. Due to the complexity of these products, and the difficulties in producing exact replicas of a reference biologic, most countries have adopted terms other than bio-generics to describe them. Health Canada, which unveiled its regulatory framework in March 2010, has chosen the term Subsequent Entry Biologic (SEB). This new regulatory framework creates an opportunity for subsequent entry biologics to become as significant a therapeutic option as the small-molecule generics have become. However, SEBs are not interchangeable with the current biologic drugs offered and we will not see significant savings generated, such as we witnessed when generic drugs were introduced into the
    marketplace.

    The above is an important trend to consider when considering plan design alternatives.



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Hamilton, ON
L8P 1J4
Phone: (905) 777-9990
Email: rmarsh@bisinc.ca